Tag Archives: Trailhead North

Help others – Leave a comment about a trail!

Got a comment about a trail? Got Facebook? Leave information for others on any one of 2600 trails in Ontario on our trail pages! For example see:http://goo.gl/XNlH7W In this case some folks help others with information about parking. Thanks

Shirley Rose

I would love to go to the lake and walk around but unless I live right by the lake there is nowhere to park to get to the lake. Does anybody go to this lake that doesn’t live right beside it because it seems to be right in the middle of apartment buildings, townhouses and houses where there is no parking. How do I get to go to the lake and where do I park so I can do this?
Craig D Tibbits ·

If you park at meadowvale towncenter close to the bus terminal. There is a path from the bus terminal that leads right into the ” aquitaine loop ” trail as i call it. Walk my dog there all the time. Its great. Walk across the field where the busses pick up passengers. And the path leads to a tunnel with beautiful murals and past the community center and voila your at lake aquitaine. Enjoy.
Like · Reply · 11 hrs

Our condolences to family, friends and wilderness canoeists – George Luste

Loss of a Legend: George Luste, 1940-2015

Remembering an inveterate wilderness traveler

April 02, 2015By

George-luste

On a snowy February day in Toronto, I’m feeling inadequate standing at the podium in a high-school auditorium—not because of the 500 people in the audience, but for one larger than life man in the front row. Retired physicist George Luste founded theWilderness Canoe Symposium 30 years ago as a way for paddlers to share stories of their northern expeditions and to inspire new trips. The event has the feel of a latter-day Beaver Club—the exclusive gang of fur-traders who explored and mapped Canada in the 18th and 19th century and gathered to chat about it in wintery Montreal.

Following in the paddle strokes of explorers David Thompson, Alexander Mackenzie and Samuel Hearne, Luste spent 55 summers traveling Canada’s far north. He immigrated to Canada from Latvia in 1948 and made his first canoe trip in 1963, a solo journey on Ontario’s Abitibi River. He completed a Ph. D. at Johns Hopkins University before returning to Canada in 1971 for a professorship at the University of Toronto.

Canoeing was Luste’s passion. He paddled Canada’s iconic wilderness rivers—the Missinaibi, Rupert, Eastmain, Kazan, Nahanni, Coppermine, Stikine, and George—often in the company of his wife, Linda, and their children. What’s more, he was part of a group that made the first complete descent of the Dubawnt River in the Canadian barrenlands, pioneered many other multi-watershed routes, and was amongst the last to paddle Labrador’s Grand River before a massive hydroelectric project was completed at Churchill Falls.

Full Article – https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/#search/googlealerts-noreply%40google.com/14c829842c123947

Lots of signs of spring at Ontario Parks – some in the north too!

JIM FOX, SPECIAL TO QMI AGENCY

Mar 31, 2015

, Last Updated: 11:43 AM ET

You know it’s spring in Ontario Parks when you discover these 10 signs.

Lori Waldbrook of Ontario Parks has put together this list, starting with seeing moose that are salt-depleted by the end of winter.

They head to roadside ditches to lick up road salt especially along Highway 60 in Algonquin Provincial Park.

Then there’s hearing the great horned and eastern screech owls and seeing mourning cloak butterflies in forests on sunny days and spotting spring tails, tiny insects that look like black powder on patches of snow and downed wood.

Listen for a chorus of spring peepers – tiny frogs on warm evenings – seeing the sap flow and turning into maple syrup, hearing the chickadees sing and the tundra swans return en route to the Arctic.

You can see buds forming on trees during a spring park hike and see experienced paddlers on an ice-out adventure with higher water levels that allow them to explore areas not accessible by canoe or kayak in the summer.

More details on the Ontario Parks blog.

Full Article Here http://www.canoe.ca/Travel/Canada/2015/03/31/22318891.html

Ontario Investing in Cycling Infrastructure – should help tourism and trails

NEWS RELEASE

Ontario Investing $25 Million in Cycling Infrastructure

Province Supports Safe, Active Transportation

April 1, 2015 8:00 A.M.

Ministry of Transportation

As part of Ontario’s 20-year #CycleON strategy, the province is moving forward with a $25-million investment over three years to create a more cycling-friendly future for the province.

This includes $15 million for cycling routes that provide key connections and linkages on provincial highways, such as paved highway shoulders and barriers on bridges that separate cyclists from vehicles. Early proposals include:

  • Highway 33 west of Kingston (part of the Waterfront Trail)
  • Highway 137 structure over the 1000 Island Parkway (part of the Waterfront Trail)
  • Highway 6 on Manitoulin Island and south of Highway 17 at Espanola (part of the Georgian Bay Cycling Route)
  • Highway 17B and Highway 17 between Sault Ste. Marie and Espanola (part of the Lake Huron North Channel Cycling Route)

The province has also dedicated $10 million to the Ontario Municipal Cycling Infrastructure Program to help municipalities:

  • Expand their local cycling routes
  • Connect with provincial cycling routes
  • Launch pilot projects to make cycling improvements

Consultations on the municipal program have concluded and the launch is on track for spring 2015. Work is also underway to identify a provincewide network of cycling routes in collaboration with a broad range of cycling stakeholders.

Investing in infrastructure is part of the government’s economic plan for Ontario. The four part plan is building Ontario up by investing in people’s talents and skills, building new public infrastructure like roads and transit, creating a dynamic, supportive environment where business thrives, and building a secure savings plan so everyone can afford to retire.

Quick Facts

  • According to the National Trauma Registry, Ontario has the second-lowest cycling injury rate of all Canadian provinces.
  • Ontario has enhanced the Driver’s Handbook to include information about sharing the road safely with cyclists.
  • Ontario’s public education efforts to promote cycling safety include Cycling Skills, Young Cyclist’s Guide, a partnership with TVOKids targeting children and parents and support for stakeholders to deliver public education resources at the community, regional and provincial level.
  • According to the Canadian Medical Association, a 10 per cent increase in physical activity could reduce direct health-care expenditures by $150 million a year.

Additional Resources

Quotes

Steven Del Duca

“We know that working with our partners is key to creating a more cycling-friendly Ontario. We’ll continue to engage municipalities, road users, businesses, advocacy groups and non-governmental organizations to make sure we get it right.”

Steven Del Duca

Minister of Transportation

Kathryn McGarry

“Cycling helps to build more healthy, active and prosperous communities as it generates a wide range of health, economic, environmental, social and other benefits.”

Kathryn McGarry

Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Transportation

There is some debate in the cycling community that this is a re-commitment to an announcement made in April 2014.

Some Indigenous Peoples are joining us for Trailhead North – welcome!

First Nations want management control of Ogoki Forest

By: Northern Ontario Business staff
Aroland Chief Sonny Gagnon, Chief Elizabeth Atlookan and Marten Falls Interim Chief Bruce Achneepineskum sign Ogoki Forest unity agreement.
Aroland Chief Sonny Gagnon, Chief Elizabeth Atlookan and Marten Falls Interim Chief Bruce Achneepineskum sign Ogoki Forest unity agreement.
The northwestern Ontario First Nations of Aroland, Eabametoong and Marten Falls have signed a forest tenure agreement on the Ogoki Forest in northwestern Ontario.

The three First Nations say they will play “a leading role in forest governance” toward obtaining a long-term forest license for the Ogoki Forest Management Unit.

The communities want take control of forest management planning, harvesting, road construction, silviculture, environmental monitoring, reporting and also establish forest-based First Nations business ventures.

Located 250 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay, the Ogoki Forest is considered part of the traditional land of the communities in providing a place to hunt, fish, trap, and provide medicine.

Link to full article – http://www.northernontariobusiness.com/Industry-News/aboriginal-businesses/2015/03/First-Nations-want-management-control-of-Ogoki-Forest.aspx

Baited traps on recreational trails? – caution needs to be used and postings examined

2015-03-28-1427564070-9791215-iStock_000057806914_small.jpg

The trapper feels he took ‘reasonable precautions’ to protect the public. Well, I strongly disagree.

Last December, a friend and I were walking along a public snowmobile trail on Crown Land just north of Peterborough, Ont., with my two yellow labs. My dog George was killed that day by a baited conibear trap set beside the trail.

Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), through a local Conservation Officer, has investigated the death and informed us by telephone that the investigation is closed; the trapper broke no laws.

I have to ask: How can it be completely legal to put a lethal, baited trap right on a public trail? It was bad enough with my pet. What if I’d been walking with a child?

Link to full article – http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/valerie-strain/baited-trap-dog_b_6961554.html

Ontario Endorses Northern Ontario Experiences – Trailhead North

Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario

Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario (CNW Group/Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation)

Tourism Experiences Promoted for the 2015 Season

TORONTO, March 5, 2015 /CNW/ – There is no better time than now to explore the great outdoors and tourism experiences in Northern Ontario. Through its current marketing campaign, the Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation (OTMPC) is encouraging visitors to “Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario” in 2015.

Working with tourism partners from Northern Ontario, the OTMPC campaign shares the endless, unique and awe-inspiring opportunities available in the North. A key piece of the marketing campaign is the distribution of 810,000 copies of the new Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario magazine. The magazine contains a distinctive ‘flip-the-book’ feature with half of the publication dedicated to activities across Northern Ontario’s regions and half dedicated to specific avid experiences such as angling, hunting, power sports touring and outdoor adventures.

The campaign is targeted at visitors from across Ontario, Manitoba, Quebec and the United States. Northern Ontariowill be prominently featured at trade and consumer shows focussed on activities popular in the north such as fresh-water fishing, kayaking adventures and motorcycle touring. Urban areas of the North are providing travellers with ideas: visitors can enjoy a boat ride with beautiful scenery during the day, followed by a delicious culinary dinner and festival concert in the evening.

The magazine will also be directly distributed over the next few months to outdoor enthusiast subscribers of magazines such as Outdoor Canada, Maclean’s, Our Canada and National Geographic Traveler (U.S.).

Tourists are encouraged to visit www.ontariotravel.net/north to obtain more information on Northern Ontario tourism experiences and packages.

QUOTES
“With its stunning landscapes and unique tourist attractions, Northern Ontario has long been a special destination for those who have visited. We are lucky to live in a great province with so many cultural, historic and eco experiences at our fingertips and I encourage everyone to enjoy them all. Consider choosing Northern Ontario for your next adventure – it’s closer than you think.”
— Honourable Michael Coteau, Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

“The North is truly one of Ontario’s gems. The beauty of the landscape and the experiences both indoors and outdoors will have visitors raving when they return home. OTMPC is pleased to partner with tourism stakeholders to share all the possibilities that Northern Ontario has to offer.”
Ronald Holgerson, President and CEO, Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation

Northern Ontario is front and centre with the new campaign launched by the Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation. Great outdoor products, cities, towns and attractions are all captured through thoughtful stories about why everyone should visit this part of our province. From fantastic fishing and hunting, touring experiences that are second to none and, of course, our nature and adventure product, the campaign is sure to entice travellers to the North.”
Carol Caputo, Chair, Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation Northern Tourism Marketing Committee

Northern Ontario is a vast and inviting region with a diverse and dynamic tourism economy. We are so pleased to have the opportunity to work with OTMPC and our sub-regional partners on this important campaign featuring the Northern experiences that resonate with consumers.”
David MacLachlan, Executive Director, Tourism Northern Ontario

“The best thing about the famous Canadian wilderness is that it’s closer than you think. Just two hours north ofToronto, you will find some of the most stunning natural landscapes in the nation, from iconic Algonquin Park in the east to sparkling Georgian Bay in the west. Head to the Explorers’ Edge region of Ontario to experience this province’s seriously great outdoors in a thousand spectacular ways.”
James Murphy, Executive Director, Explorers’ Edge

QUICK FACTS

  • Visitors can obtain Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario magazine from an Ontario Travel Information Centre, by calling 1-800-ONTARIO, at SAIL stores throughout Ontario and by download.
  • To jointly market the North, OTMPC works in partnership with Regional Tourism Organizations (RTO) Tourism Northern Ontario and Explorers’ Edge, and Northern Destination Marketing Organizations.
  • Visitors are encouraged to share their Ontario tourism experience on Twitter using the hashtag #DiscoverON.
  • Tourism is an important economic driver. 2012 figures indicate that tourism supported over 359,400 jobs and generated$28 billion for Ontario’s economy.
  • Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation is an agency of the Government of Ontario with a vision to positionOntario as a preferred global destination.

LEARN MORE

  • Learn more about Northern Ontario adventures and experiences.
  • Enter the Great Canadian Boreal Forest Adventure Contest.
  • Learn more about OTMPC, its programs and partnership opportunities.

If you do not wish to receive electronic messages regarding OTMPC news, please e-mail otmpc.news@ontario.caindicating “unsubscribe”.

SOURCE Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation

Image with caption: “Explore the Possibilities in Northern Ontario (CNW Group/Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation)”. Image available at:http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20150305_C4345_PHOTO_EN_12867.jpg

For further information: Lydia McCourt, Corporate Communications Manager, OTMPC, 416-314-6590,lydia.mccourt@ontario.ca, 10 Dundas Street East, Suite 900, Toronto, Ontario M7A 2A1

Sudbury Celebrates “Fire and Ice”

Outdoor gala brings ‘fire and ice’ to Sudbury’s Ramsey Lake

‘This is something in the spirit of northern Ontario, the spirit of Sudbury’

CBC News Posted: Mar 05, 2015 8:05 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 05, 2015 8:05 AM ET

The Fire and Ice Outdoor Gala will take place on Saturday, March 7, on Sudbury's Ramsey Lake.

The Fire and Ice Outdoor Gala will take place on Saturday, March 7, on Sudbury’s Ramsey Lake. Related Stories

External Links

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

Fire and Ice Outdoor Gala in Sudbury

Sudbury’s Ramsey Lake will be transformed into a winter spectacle this weekend to raise funds for the YWCA Genevra House women’s shelter.

The inaugural Fire and Ice Outdoor Gala will take place near Science North and will feature figure skaters, musicians, horses, an ice bar, and a vintage snowmobile show.

Paul Kusnierczyk

Paul Kusnierczyk is one of the people behind the Fire and Ice Outdoor Gala. (Roger Corriveau/CBC)

“It’s going to be something Sudbury has never seen before,” organizer Paul Kusnierczyk said on CBC Radio’s Morning North. “This is something in the spirit of northern Ontario, the spirit of Sudbury. Embrace the elements.”

Kusnierczyk is one of three real estate agents at Royal LePage who are raising funds for the Royal LePage Shelter Foundation. That foundation will provide the funds to the YWCA Genevra House.

Full article……