Tag Archives: trails

Ontario Trails News – G2G Trail, cycling information, paddling and Add Your Event and lots more news daily from OntarioTrails!

ADD YOUR EVENT

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You talked! We listened! As a Canadian campaign we want you to feel secure about donating in Canadian dollar currency instead of US currency. Visit our new campaign donation page at https://www.tilt.com/tilts/guelph-to-goderich-rail-trail. We have moved our campaign over to a great crowdfunding website called Tilt. Through this we are able to not only have no fees on donations we earn but when you send a donation using a Visa Debit or Mastercard Debit there are no fees at all as opposed to other platforms which can take up to 10% in site fees and credit card fees! Meaning every cent goes to this great initiative. Thank you for understanding and sharing your concerns, and thank you for donating. You can look below for our donation perks.

Each trail segment and community can benefit directly from this $60,000 fundraising campaign. We’ve had a tremendous amount of support in the past from communities that are touched by the G2G Rail Trail experience. The 127 km route is made up of the amazing Kissing Bridge Trailway, Perth Harvest Pathway and the Lake Huron Route.

G2G Crowdfunding Campaign Info:

The Guelph to Goderich Rail Trail surrounds cyclists and hikers with the richness of Ontario’s pastoral landscape and rural heritage. Through hushed forest groves and rolling Mennonite farmland, across river valleys and wetlands, past 13 villages and towns, to the sunset horizon of one of the world’s Great Lakes, visitors of all fitness and skill levels can enjoy any part of the G2G’s 127-km length through four counties. Completion of the G2G Rail Trail opens Ontario’s pastoral heartland to the global fitness and recreation phenomena of backpacking and cycle tourism. The G2G helps rural Ontarians share their countryside and hospitality with the world.

More information on the G2G Rail Trail can be found at: http://www.g2grailtrail.com/ or www.facebook.com/G2GRailTrail

Facebook sharing post:

Share the video WITH the link (https://www.tilt.com/tilts/guelph-to-goderich-rail-trail) to the fundraising page in your post and be entered to win one of five $50 Tim Horton’s gift cards (along with the other cool prizes from previous posts!).

A charitable donation tax receipt will be issued for all people donating $20 or more.

Petition captures support – No traps on trails

http://www.intelligencer.ca/2015/02/09/petition-captures-unexpected-support

When Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry Bill Mauro reported to work Monday morning, he was likely trapped with more than 34,000 e-mails.

As of Monday afternoon, more than 38,500 people had signed the ‘No Traps On Trails’ petition, requesting Mauro to prevent more animal deaths on Ontario trails due to baited kill-trap (Conibear) set up near all-season multi-use trails.

The issue struck a nerve for Buckhorn residents Valerie Strain and her husband last December when their dog George’s head got caught in a trap located on Crown land, just a few feet from a side trail near their cottage and within 20 feet of a popular snowmobile/ATV trail.

Buckhorn is about 40 kilometres north of Peterborough.

“He died a slow death, while I struggled unsuccessfully to free him,” said Strain, who launched the online petition a week ago.

She noted the ministry (MNRF), through the area’s local conservation officer, was informed of what happened to George and investigating.

“However, they told us that there are no rules about how close to trails the trap can be set and no requirement to notify the public that they are there,” she added.

“There does not seem to be any way for the public to find out where traplines are. They could be anywhere on Crown land, on your neighbour’s property, even in provincial parks and you wouldn’t know.”

Ontario Tourism is currently running ads that show a family cross-country skiing, while their dogs run off-leash beside them.

“Where is it safe to do that?” asked Strain.

She and her husband no longer feel secure anywhere except on their own property.

The petition also hit the web in light of a similar incident where a dog was killed in Stirling after its head became stuck in a Conibear trap, near the Heritage Trail in mid-December 2014.

There, the “kill-trap” was set within 30 feet of the trail.

Stirling-Rawdon Police Chief Dario Cecchin stated the day following the incident a man was walking his mid-sized dog off-leash on the trail at the time.

“Keeping dogs on leash will keep them safe from traps, predators and from becoming lost,” Cecchin then stated. “Also, trappers need to understand and obey their obligations under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.”

Strain and her husband both grew up in rural areas. The couple had no idea of the risk they were taking every time they took their dogs out on the trail across their home.

“One of our responsibilities as pet owners is to keep them safe,” she said. “We failed George in that regard.”

With ‘No Traps On Trails’, Strain wants to make sure this doesn’t happen to another family pet, “or worse” to a child out on a walk with their parents.

To prevent more deaths on Ontario trails and improve the safety of everyone sharing public outdoor spaces, Strain and thousands of supporters urge MNRF to launch a public awareness campaign about the danger to pets and people from active traps and improve trapping practices and regulations.

“Including publishing maps online that show registered trapline areas, setting a minimum distance from public trails and marking trails that run close to traplines,” she said.

While Strain is not surprised by the number of online signatures captured within a week, she did not expect her initiative would escalate “so quickly”. The couple think they have found a middle ground between those who support trapping and those who don’t.

“I think it struck a nerve,” she said.

“I think people care about this. They think the request that we’ve made to the MNRF is reasonable. Even people that support trapping can get behind this.”

Jolanta Kowalski, senior media relations officer with MNRF, says there are steps dog owners like Strain can take to ensure their dogs are not impacted by legally set traps.

“The most important step is keeping control of your pet at all times by keeping your dog leashed,” she said in an e-mail to The Intelligencer.

“I offer my condolences to anyone who has lost a pet under such circumstances.”

She noted MNRF officials will consider any recommendations brought forward that might ultimately reduce the chance of a pet being caught in a trap.

The MNRF’s website has detailed information about trapping laws and practices in Ontario. More information can be found here.

jerome.lessard@sunmedia.ca

Trailhead North – a discussion amongst users and managers, April 17, 18, 2015

A a group of trail stakeholders

We want to encourage this – http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/2015/01/14/more-snowmobiling-trails-expected-to-open-in-coming-weeks

We want to avoid this: http://www.saultstar.com/2015/01/26/chapleau-groups-demise-has-ripple-effects

The Voyageur Trail Association – a supporter of Trailhead North

HIKE VIDEO.
On Sunday October 21st, 2012 members of the Nor’Wester Trail Club and friends hiked through Pigeon River Provincial Park at the Canada / US border to High Falls. This was an easy / moderate hike, however, if you aren’t good with heights, parts of the trail can get intimidating!  Along the way, hikers stopped to view the only 2 remaining structures from an old “resort” that lie on the shore of the Pigeon River. This video was shot, compiled and edited by Club Member Steve Johnston of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Thanks Steve!

Nipigon Tower and Trails – sky high views

Nipigon tower promises ‘incredible’ view to attract tourists 

CBC News Posted: Jan 07, 2015 3:03 PM ET Last Updated: Jan 07, 2015 3:03 PM ET

Northern Development Minister Michael Gravelle and Nipigon Mayor Richard Harvey stand in front of an image of the Nipigon waterfront development plan, at the town offices on Wednesday.

Northern Development Minister Michael Gravelle and Nipigon Mayor Richard Harvey stand in front of an image of the Nipigon waterfront development plan, at the town offices on Wednesday. (Township of Nipigon)

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Visitors to Nipigon are expected to get a panoramic view of Lake Superior and the distant countryside once a lookout tower is constructed in the community.

The Northern Ontario Heritage Fund is providing $1 million for the project and other aspects of a tourism development plan, Northern Development minister Michael Gravelle announced Wednesday.

Nipigon Mayor Richard Harvey said he expects the tower will boost tourism in the area.

“We’re gonna have a 360 degree view that will be looking into Greenstone,” he said.

“We’ll be looking probably almost over to Rossport. We’ll be seeing all the way out to St. Ignace Island, possibly right over to the American border. It’s gonna be an incredible view up there.”